Three D.I.Y. games to make and play at home

Looking for some fun stay-at-home activities? Our Bar Experience Manager at Bergamo’s, Adam O’Connor, put together a guide for three D.I.Y. games that you can create and play at home. We’d love to know which is your favorite.

Share photos of your own version with us on Twitter or Instagram and we may even feature you. Let the games begin!

Ring Toss

Supplies:
4 aluminum cans
8 glass bottles (different shapes and sizes)
Scissors
Knife
Thick gloves (preferably steel gloves, but thick winter gloves work too)
Duct tape (or painter’s tape)
Pliers
Cutting board

Step 1:

 

 

Wearing thick gloves, carefully insert your knife into an aluminum can as close to the lip as possible (unless they are steel, the gloves will really only protect you from the sharp edges of the can, not the knife). Carefully cut around the edge of the can.

Step 2: 

 

 

Using scissors, cut slits into the top of the can until you can peel back the aluminum. Then use the pliers to tear off the triangles from the top. If you have a lot of overhang on the bottom, you can peel as much as possible away with the pliers. 

Compress the aluminum till they are flush against the lip of the lid and create as wide a ring as possible. Simply wrap the entire ring with duct tape to avoid pricking bare skin with any sharp edges. It will also serve as a weight to help with the ring toss. 

Step 3:

 

 

Using the scissors, cut a wider ring from the inside of the can. First, cut a slit about an inch or two inside the can. Continue to cut along your incision until you are left with a ring. Having two rings of differing size will create difference in difficulty, and point-scoring. Fold the top part of the ring into the middle.

Compress. Repeat on the other side. The final product should look like this. Run your gloved hand around it, if it snags, keep crimping to smooth it out. Join at the ends and seal with duct tape, using small sections at a time to go under and over until it looks like this:

 

How to play:

  1. Arrange glass bottles of various sizes and shapes in any manner you desire.
  2. Hand the 4 smaller rings and 4 larger rings to the first player.
  3. Stand at the designated spot of your choosing (it’s really hard, start up close.)
  4. Toss the rings. Any of the larger rings that stay around the bottle are worth one point, smaller rings are worth two.
  5. For variations, different bottles may provide more difficulty, or can be placed in difficult places. Perhaps use multipliers for these!
  6. Once the first player has thrown all 8 rings, pass to the next.
  7. First to the point value agreed upon wins (recommend starting low).

Hint: Save your bottles! You will need them for the next game.

Bowling

Supplies:
10 empty bottles of beer or wine
Duct tape
Round objects (such as fruits or vegetables)
Cling wrap

 

 

Step 1:

Rinse the bottles until they do not contain any trace of alcohol.

Step 2:

Wrap the bottles in duct tape, making sure cover it from base to lip. I found it easiest to start from the bottom. This is extremely important, as you will be knocking them around a lot. The duct tape will ensure they don’t break, and if they do, the shards will be contained.

Step 3:

As I am not an athletic type, I do not own any kind of sports-related balls. So, I had to settle for an onion and a lime. Unless you don’t want to use them again, I recommend wrapping them in cling wrap, using a strip of duct tape to seal any bit that sticks out.

Step 4:

Find the longest strip of real estate you can and arrange the bottles in the classic bowling-pin arrangement (1, 2, 3, and 4). I recommend keeping them close together (it’s harder than it looks). Assign a “throw line” and bowl away! (In the end, the onion worked best. It was the roundest and the heaviest.)

Duck Hunt

Supplies:
Knife
Cutting board
Pair of heavy winter gloves (preferably steel if you have them)
Aluminum cans
Twine
Thumbtacks, small nails, etc. (thumbtacks work best)
Any piece of rubbish (that you can tie a string around and will fit inside a can)
Bottle caps, corks, hair ties, rubber bands
Box fan/free-floating fan (optional)

Note: If you have not already made the ring toss game, you may also need scissors.

Step 1:

 

 

Wearing thick gloves, carefully insert your knife into the aluminum can as close to the lip as possible (unless they are steel, the gloves will really only protect you from the sharp edges of the can, not the knife). Carefully cut around the edge of the can. When it is separated, save the top for Ring Toss game (see above).

Using the scissors, cut a wider ring from the inside of the can. First, cut a slit about an inch or two inside the can. Continue to cut along your incision until you are left with a ring about an inch thick and a can about ⅔ the original size.

Step 2:

 

 

Cut your twine and string at various lengths between 12″ – 36″. Use whatever rubbish you may have around the house that will fit inside the can, but not through the hole you made. I have dogs, and their doggy bags come wrapped around these plastic tubes that I always seem to find in my pockets. I use those.

Tie the lengths of string around the middle of whatever you use. Feed the string through the hole in the can, with the free end starting inside going out. Somewhere towards the end of the free end, insert a thumbtack into the string.

Using a stepladder, chair, or other sturdy item (be sure you have a spotter), stick the string to the ceiling. Repeat with the rest of your cans. Hang as many as you like. Be sure to hang them at various distances and lengths.

 

 

How to play:

  1. Assign point values to each can based on how difficult it will be to hit them. For example, cans further away and either further up or lower to the ground are generally more difficult to hit than those that are closer and at shoulder level.
  2. Designate your “throwing line”.
  3. Using the corks, bottle tops, free-floating rubbish, etc. toss (don’t throw) towards the cans. If you have rubber bands or hair ties, it’s really fun (and safer for breakables) to shoot rubber-bands at the cans.
  4. If you make it inside the cans, you either use multipliers (I recommend at least x5 because it’s really hard, and not always possible based on can orientation) or outright “godwin.”
  5. For added difficulty/fun, aim a box fan for a true “duck hunt” experience.